Intro to Homebrewing

An intro to homebrewing your own delicious beer.

    • Designed for beginning through intermediate brewers
    • Learn key terms
    • Overview of the ingredients and what they contribute
    • How different beer styles are created
    • The basic brewing process
    • Tips and Tricks for a successful brew day
    • Emphasis is on partial grain AKA extract AKA extract with grains brewing.
    • Saving the universe through homebrew!
    • Class Length – 1.5-2 hrs

 

View our intro to brewing video here.

Reserve Your Seat Here

Mastering Malt Workshop

Are you a brewer of any level interested in elevating your brewing knowledge about malt? Are you in the industry and planning on taking an advanced beer service certification exam? Welcome to our Master Workshops!

Using malt teas and an in-depth presentation on the malting process, get to really know the most fundamental ingredient in beer. This class is designed for brewers of all levels.

This hands-on malt workshop covers in depth the malting process and how the choice of different malts can dramatically effect your beers.

In the first half of the class we will discuss how grain becomes malt and the different processes that create base and specialty malts.

The second half of the class we will taste up to 20 “malt teas” in order to get really know this essential ingredient

Topics will include:

Barley varieties
Grain to malt
Workings of a modern malthouse
Base grains and their uses
Kilned vs roasted malts
Mashing and enzymes
Malt tea tasting
Tools and tips to for choosing the malt bill of your next recipe

Class includes two 8oz. pours from our tasting room

Class length 2 hours

RESERVE YOUR SEAT HERE

 

 

 

Intro to Kegging Homebrew

This class covers the entire process of kegging homebrew — from equipment needs to the carbonation process, serving methods and troubleshooting. We’ll also look at home draft systems and their maintenance. This class is designed for brewers of all levels.

Topics will include:

Demonstration of the kegging process
Options for carbonation
Overview of draft systems — from picnic taps to commercial and DIY kegerators
Basic principles of draft system balance and maintenance
Filling bottles and growlers from your tap
Troubleshooting common issues

Class includes two 8oz. pours from our tasting room

Class length 1.5 hours

RESERVE YOUR SEAT HERE

Beer Off Flavors Workshop

Learn about the beer off flavors, how to identify them, and how to correct them.

A large part about improving yourself as a brewer is understanding how to identify off flavors, how they are created, and how to avoid them. These skill sets are also important for bartenders, servers, restaurant/bar owners.

The average beer consumer should also be aware of how to identify these flaws, and how to politely address the issue if they are served a flawed beer. Not all flaws are equal, and some “flaws” are acceptable to a certain degree in many styles. This course will serve as a building block for building your overall beer knowledge and appreciation.

This 1.5 hr class will provide samples of a control beer that has been dosed with the chemical compounds that we associate with the most common off-flavors in beer production and draft dispense. Includes:

*8* Off-flavors
1 control beer
Guided tasting/instruction

Must be 21, or older, to attend. Valid ID MUST be present at tasting.

RESERVE YOUR SEAT HERE

Intro to Homebrewing

  • An intro to homebrewing class that will get you making your own delicious beer!
  • Designed for beginning through intermediate brewers
  • Learn key terms
  • Overview of the ingredients and what they contribute
  • How different beer styles are created
  • The basic brewing process
  • Tips and Tricks for a successful brew day
  • Emphasis is on partial grain AKA extract AKA extract with grains brewing.
  • Saving the universe through homebrew!
  • Class Length – 1.5-2 hrs

View our intro to brewing video here. Reserve Your Seat Here

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Wyeast Now in Stock

We have expanded our offerings from Wyeast Labs. We have always carried their American Ale, Pacman (Rogue), and Denny’s Favorite, but we are now carrying the following strains in addition:

German Ale, British Ale, Whitbread, Ringwood, Northwest, Kolsch, Belgian Abbey Ale II, Forbidden Fruit, French Saison, Belgian Saison, Roeselare Blend, and Trappist High Gravity.

You’ll find them in the yeast fridge sharing two blue containers. Click here for more info about each individual strain.

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NHC 2013 – Philadelphia, PA

Last week was the 35th Annual National Homebrewer’s Conference. This year hosted by the great beer town of Philadelphia. We (or I, George) was lucky enough to attend, and am very happy to report back on the overall experience. The location was perfect, the seminars were fun and informative, and beer tourism was phenomenal, and in fact, really made the trip for me.

Philly boasts some of the coolest beer bars & beer-centric restaurants you could wish for. We arrived on Tuesday, two nights before the conference began, and our first order of business was to visit Monk’s Cafe, a cozy Belgian-beer-lover’s paradise. In fact, Michael Jackson commented that it was America’s best Belgian beer bar, and many would argue that this is still true. There certainly isn’t anything quite like it in San Diego, although if you combined the tap list at Small Bar, with the bottle list at Hamilton’s Tavern, you would get kinda sorta close. You’d be missing moules frites, however (sad face). There is also a good offering of German beer bars in the city. Bru Carft, and Brauhaus Schmidtz being the two we had the pleasure of checking out. Again, we simply don’t have these sort of options in San Diego. Occasionally you can count on a solid Kolsch at Tiger!Tiger!, or Blind Lady Ale House, but there aren’t any places with the consistent selection of these Philly beer spots.

Food wise, we enjoyed the above mentioned spots, but other standouts included The Farmer’s Cabinet. Rag time piano, lots of wood, and an ecclectic beer list featuring many fantastic Northern European breweries (Haandbryggeriet of Norway, for instance). A large group of fantastic homebrewers with large hearts enjoyed an outstanding meal there.

The conference itself offered a solid variety of topics to satisfy the interests of any homebrewer. Topics included, sensory analysis (presented by San Diego’s own Kara Taylor of White Labs), Cider (again, San Diego great, Chris Banker of QUAFF), hops, hops, oh and one that talked a little about hops, mash chemistry, building a walk-in cooler, a “going pro” panel, mead and chocolate pairing, and more. You can view the details/presentations from previous years here. As of this posting 2013’s notes are not available yet, but they will be shortly.

Many of the seminars include samples of beer, but there are many other opportunities to fill your glass throughout the weekend. The Pro Brewer’s Night is a great opportunity to sample pro beers from nearby and from around the country. Club Night is the zaniest of all, and is essentially a rager done in all the nerdy glory that only homebrewers can accomplish. Clubs from near and far offer samples of their brews for all to try.

The weekend is wrapped up with a banquet, which includes the awards ceremony for the National Homebrewer’s Competition. Rogue provides the beers, and Homebrew Chef Sean Paxton creates the menu.

All-in-all I highly recommend making the trip out to NHC every year if you can. Next years will be hosted by Grand Rapids, MI. So we will see you there.

My account of the weekend is a summed up version of an all out action packed visit, so please include any of your favorite moments below.

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Our License to Brew Beer

Today we received our packet from the ABC. Included is a checklist of forms to complete, and a nifty sign to post in our window. Essentially we are now in the protest phase of our application. The sign in our window will remain for 30 days, and we are required to send out notifications to nearby residences. The community has 30 days to make any protests. At that point it is up to us to negotiate/explain/placate any and all concerns. It’s an important process designed to empower the community.

So are we so nervous? Well, there is small, and vocal, portion of our community that opposes absolutely every application, forcing applicants to spend money on rent, lawyers, and delayed start dates. We can’t afford much of this.

The SD Police Department is also vocal in this process. As they should be. They are the ones that we all rely on to keep our streets & sidewalks safe, and they are grossly underfunded and overworked. They are likely to impose as many restrictions as they can. We will be reaching out to them in the coming days so that we can begin the dialogue.

For now, we will post below a copy of the letter to our neighbors that we have posted next to our sign. It will answer some basic questions about our goals/vision.

Dear Neighbors,
We are excited to announce our plans to begin brewing on the small scale. Our plans for our brewery are a little different than most, so we hope you will take the time to read the Q&A below in order to learn more. Most of all, we are honored to have this opportunity to play a long lasting, sustainable, and positive role in the growth of our beautiful neighborhood.
We invite you to come in and chat with us about our plans. You can also email us at brew@thehomebrewersd.com.

Q: What is The Homebrewer?
A: We are a resource center for homebrewers. We provide the equipment, ingredients, and knowledge for those interested in making their own beer at home. Our emphasis is on educating the community about how to make quality, great tasting beer, and how to appreciate the rich history and many styles of beer with respect and responsibility.

Q: Do you intend to become a bar?
A: Absolutely not. Our favorite bars are nearby, and within walking distance of our shop, you should go check them out. We will not serve the quantities or have the operating hours of a bar.

Q: So then why do you need this license?
A: This license will allow us to brew examples of certain styles, showcase specific ingredients, and demonstrate different brewing techniques. This will better enable us to inform/educate all of our customers and the community at large. We hold regular classes about how to brew beer at home, and this will allow us to serve you all better in this regard.

Q: What will the atmosphere be like?
A: Our beer showcase room will feel more like a small winery than a bar/”tasting room.” Our staff will be trained to discuss the different aspects/qualities or beer making, and our goal is to educate and inform the average consumer and the homebrewer of every skill level.

Q: What kind of beer will you produce?
A: We would like to create beers that you can enjoy with your favorite family dinner. This means low to moderate alcohol levels, and flavors that are ideal for food pairing.

Q: What is your ideal customer/transaction?
A: We hope you will come in, try a few examples of different beer styles/brewing techniques. Ask our knowledgeable staff about how those beers were created, what foods they will pair with, and which beers like it you should look out for at nearby establishments. If one of our beers is ideal for your next meal, we hope that you will take a refillable bottle of it home to share with your friends and family.

Q: Are you willing to listen to any concerns?
A: Certainly. Our neighborhood and it’s future is an ongoing community effort that requires the input and consideration of every one of us. We all of have valid points about what our neighborhood should look like in the future, and it is all of our responsibilities to take the time to share our views and listen to the views of others. We want our business to play a positive, long-lasting role in our neighborhood, and we want every individual to feel empowered about the direction we are all taking. We only ask that you keep an open mind to our dreams, vision, ideals, and opinions about how to create sustainable, walk-able, friendly, and economically viable neighborhoods.

Sincerely,

The Homebrewer – (George, Molly, Chris, Doug, Francisco, Robby)

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Dry-Hop Experiment

Jeff from Mash Heads, a homebrew club in San Diego proposed an experiment in which we dry hopped bottles of beer with different varieties.

We had a keg of Mission Brewing light lager to work with, an ideal base for our experiment. We filled 15 22 oz bottles using a ratio of 1/2 oz per gallon, many higher gravity IPAs use 1 oz per gallon.

Jamie and Tricia from Mash Heads were kind enough to host the tasting at their house. There were about 12 Mash Heads present.

For info about the hops we used, and some tasting notes check out Jamies blog at The Cask & Barrel.